Essay On My Native Place Nagpur Map

Maharashtra, state of India, occupying a substantial portion of the Deccan plateau in the western peninsular part of the subcontinent. Its shape roughly resembles a triangle, with the 450-mile (725-km) western coastline forming the base and its interior narrowing to a blunt apex some 500 miles (800 km) to the east. Maharashtra is bounded by the Indian states of Gujarat to the northwest, Madhya Pradesh to the north, Chhattisgarh to the east, Telangana to the southeast, Karnataka to the south, and Goa to the southwest and by the union territory of Dadra and Nagar Haveli and the Arabian Sea to the west.

Maharashtra’s capital, Mumbai (formerly Bombay), is an island city on the western coast, connected to the mainland by roads and railways. Aptly called the gateway of India, Maharashtra is one of India’s biggest commercial and industrial centres, and it has played a significant role in the country’s social and political life.

Maharashtra is a leader among Indian states in terms of agricultural and industrial production, trade and transport, and education. Its ancient culture, at one stage considerably obscured by British dominance, survives largely through the medium of a strong literary heritage. A common literature in Marathi, the predominant language of the state, has in fact played an important role in nurturing a sense of unity among the Maharashtrians. Area 118,800 square miles (307,690 square km). Pop. (2011) 112,372,972.

Land

Relief, drainage, and soils

Maharashtra presents a complex range of physical diversity. To the west is the narrow Konkan coastal lowland, which reaches its widest extent near Mumbai. Numerous minor hills dominate the relief. There are many small, swift, west-flowing streams, most of them less than 50 miles (80 km) long. The biggest, the Ulhas, rising in the Bhor Ghat, joins the sea after an 80-mile (130-km) course.

The WesternGhats (a mountain range at the western edge of the Deccan plateau; ghat means “pass” in Marathi) run almost continuously for 400 miles (640 km) north-south, with the foothills reaching to within 4 miles (6.4 km) of the Arabian Sea. Elevations increase northward to peaks of some 4,720 feet (1,440 metres). There are a few passes through which roads and railroads link the coast with the interior. The eastern slopes of the Ghats descend gently to the Deccan plateau and are sculptured by the wide mature valleys of the Krishna, Bhima, and Godavari rivers.

Between the Narmada River valley in the north, the Krishna basin in the south, and the western coast to as far east as the city of Nagpur, the Ghats and the triangular plateau inland are covered with extensive lava outpourings called traps. They reach a maximum thickness of some 10,000 feet (3,000 metres) near Mumbai. The differential erosion of lava has resulted in characteristic steppelike slopes, uniform crest lines, and a tabletop appearance of many hills in Maharashtra.

Around Nagpur, the Deccan Traps give way to undulating uplands (about 890 to 1,080 feet [270 to 330 metres] high) underlain by ancient crystalline rocks. The Wardha-Wainganga valley, part of the larger Godavari basin, trends southward and has many lakes.

A major part of Maharashtra is covered in black soils derived from decomposed lava rocks that are commonly called “black cotton soils” (because cotton often is grown in them). Drifts along the slopes have eroded into medium brown and light-coloured sandy soils. Saline soils in the river valleys are the results of impeded soil drainage followed by intense evaporation.

Climate

The climate is subtropical to tropical (depending on elevation) and characteristically monsoonal (i.e., wet-dry), with local variations. India’s southwest monsoonal rains break on the Mumbai coast usually in the first week of June and last until September, during which period they account for about four-fifths of the annual rainfall. Four seasons are normal: March–May (hot and dry), June–September (hot and wet), October–November (warm and dry), and December–February (cool and dry).

The Western Ghats and the ranges on the northern borders greatly influence the climate and separate the wet Konkan Coast from the dry interior upland, an area called the Desh. Rainfall is extremely heavy in Konkan, averaging about 100 inches (2,540 mm), with some of the wettest spots receiving up to 250 inches (6,350 mm), but rapidly diminishes to one-fifth of that amount east of the Ghats. Rainfall increases again in the eastern areas, reaching about 40 to 80 inches (1,000 to 2,000 mm) in the extreme east.

The coastal regions enjoy equable temperatures; monthly averages at Mumbai are in the low 80s F (about 27–28 °C). A change of more than about 13 °F (7 °C) between day and night temperatures is unusual. Pune (Poona), higher up on the plateau, benefits from cooler temperatures throughout the year. In the interior, average summer temperatures reach into the low 100s F (about 38–41 °C), and winter temperatures average in the low 70s F (about 21–23 °C).

Plant and animal life

Forests cover less than one-fifth of the state and are confined to the Western Ghats, mainly their transverse ranges, the Satpura Range in the north, and the Chandrapur region in the east. On the coast and adjoining slopes, plant forms are rich with lofty trees, variegated shrubs, and mango and coconut trees. The forests yield teak, bamboo, myrobalan (for dyeing), and other woods.

Thorny savanna-like vegetation occurs in areas of lesser rainfall, notably in upland Maharashtra. Subtropical vegetation is found on higher plateaus that receive heavy rain and have milder temperatures. Bamboo, chestnut, and magnolia are common. In the semiarid tracts, wild dates are found. Mangrove vegetation occurs in marshes and estuaries along the coast.

Wild animals include tigers, leopards, bison, and several species of antelope. The striped hyena, wild hog, and sloth bear are common. Monkeys and snakes occur in great variety, as do ducks and other game birds. The peacock is indigenous. Many of those animals can be viewed at the state’s national parks at Tadoba, Chikhaldara, and Borivli. The state’s abundant marine life in the waters off the western coast remains largely unexploited.

People

Population composition

Maharashtrians are ethnically heterogeneous. The Bhil, Warli, Gond, Korku, Govari, and dozens of other tribal communities—all officially designated as Scheduled Tribes—live on the slopes of the Western Ghats and the Satpura Range. Marathas and Kunbis (descendants of settlers who arrived from the north about the beginning of the 1st century ce) make up the majority of the remainder of the people of Maharashtra. The state also has a significant population of those who were once called “untouchables” but are now officially classed as Scheduled Castes, most of whom live in rural areas.

Marathi, the official state language, is spoken by more than four-fifths of the population. Other languages spoken in the state are Gujarati, Hindi, Telugu, Kannada, Sindhi, Urdu, Bengali, Malayalam, and English. There are also many local languages, including Konkani on the west coast and Gondi, Varhadi, and Mundari in the eastern and northern forests.

Maharashtra’s religious diversity reflects that of India as a whole. Hindus predominate, followed by Muslims and Buddhists. There are many Christians in the metropolitan areas. Jewish and Parsi (a religious minority adhering to Zoroastrianism) groups have settled mostly in urban areas; Parsis live mainly in Mumbai and its environs. Other religious minorities include Jainas and Sikhs, whose small communities are widespread.

Settlement patterns

More than half of the population is rural and lives in villages. The urban-rural ratio has been changing, however, especially since the late 20th century, when some two-thirds were rural dwellers. Mumbai, the largest city in the state, is also the most populous metropolis in India. Nagpur, Pune, and Solapur are other major cities. Of particular historical interest is the Mughal city of Aurangabad, in the northwest-central part of the state, which contains several monuments and other historic buildings.

Economy

The national and state governments have promoted both improved agricultural techniques and increased industrialization of the economy. As a result, Maharashtra has become one of the most developed and prosperous Indian states. Mumbai, one of India’s most important ports, handles an enormous foreign trade. It is a hub of manufacturing, finance, and administration but also a national centre for motion-picture production. Pune has developed many industries because of its proximity to Mumbai. Nagpur and Solapur have textile and other agriculturally based industries.

Agriculture

Insufficient rainfall in much of Maharashtra constitutes the main obstacle to agriculture in the state. Measures to combat food deficits have included the electrification of irrigation pumps, the use of hybrid seeds, more efficient cultivation, and incentives offered to farmers. Maharashtra is the largest producer of sugarcane in India. Jowar (grain sorghum), millet, and pulses (legumes) dominate the cropped area. Rice grows where rainfall exceeds 40 inches (1,000 mm), and wheat is a winter crop in fields that retain moisture. Cotton, tobacco, and peanuts (groundnuts) are major crops in areas with heavy rainfall. Mangoes, cashew nuts, bananas, and oranges are popular orchard crops.

Resources and power

Most of Maharashtra’s known mineral resources—including manganese, coal, iron ore, limestone, copper, bauxite, silica sand, and common salt—occur in the eastern districts, with some deposits in the west. The Bhandara, Nagpur, and Chandrapur regions are particularly rich in bituminous coal. Undersea petroleum deposits were discovered near Mumbai in the 1970s and have since been exploited, enhancing the city’s economic importance nationally. The mountainous areas of the state possess significant timber reserves.

Hydroelectric and thermal stations provide most of the state’s power. Large thermal power plants, which burn coal, are located near Nagpur and Chandrapur. The nuclear power facility at Tarapur, 70 miles (113 km) north of Mumbai, was India’s first nuclear power plant.

Manufacturing

The manufacture of cotton textiles is the oldest and largest industry in Maharashtra. Mumbai, Nagpur, Solapur, Akola, and Amravati are the main factory centres; woolen goods are produced especially in and around Nagpur and Solapur. Other hubs of traditional agriculturally based industry include Jalgaon and Dhule (edible oils processing) and Kolhapur, Ahmadnagar, and the industrial complex of Sangli and Miraj (sugar refining). Fruit canning and preservation are important in Nagpur, Bhusawal, Ratnagiri, and Mumbai. Processed forest products include timber, bamboo, sandalwood, and tendu leaves—the latter used for rolling bidi (Indian cigarettes). Small-scale agroprocessing of food grains and other crops is virtually ubiquitous in the state.

The Mumbai-Pune complex boasts the state’s greatest concentration of heavy industry and high technology. The petrochemical industry has developed rapidly since the installation of India’s first offshore oil wells near Mumbai in 1976. Oil refining and the manufacture of agricultural implements, transport equipment, rubber products, electric and oil pumps, lathes, compressors, sugar-mill machinery, typewriters, refrigerators, electronic equipment, and television and radio sets are important. Automobiles are also assembled there.

The eastern area around Nagpur, Chandrapur, and Bhandara supports major coal-based industries, along with plants that process ferroalloys, manganese and iron ores, and cement. Aurangabad and Thane are also important industrial hubs.

Transportation

The state’s rail network is vital to Maharashtra’s transport system. The Konkan Railway links Mumbai with settlements in the coastal plain. Wardha and Nagpur are important junctions on the rail routes. National highways connect the state with Delhi, Kolkata (Calcutta), Allahabad, Hyderabad, and Bengaluru (Bangalore).

Daily air services connect Mumbai with Pune, Nagpur, Aurangabad, and Nashik. The international airport at Mumbai is one of India’s busiest and largest hubs, and Nagpur is the centre of India’s domestic air service. Inland water transport plays a limited role in Maharashtra, and other than Mumbai there are only minor ports on the western coast.

Government and society

Constitutional framework

The structure of the government of Maharashtra, like that of most other states of India, is determined by the national constitution of 1950. The head of state is the governor, who is appointed by the president of India. The governor is aided and advised by the Council of Ministers (led by a chief minister) and is responsible to the legislature, which consists of two houses: the Vidhan Parishad (Legislative Council) and the Vidhan Sabha (Legislative Assembly). Both bodies meet for regular sessions in Mumbai and once annually in Nagpur. Seats are reserved for members of Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes and for women. Maharashtra is represented in the Lok Sabha and the Rajya Sabha (which are, respectively, the lower and upper houses of the Indian Parliament).

Executive authority in the state is exercised by the cabinet, headed by the chief minister, who is chosen from the members of the ruling party in the Vidhan Sabha. The district collector and chief executive officer—responsible for the collection of land revenue and special taxes and for coordinating the work of other departments—are the key figures within the local administrative areas.

The judiciary, a High Court headed by the chief justice and a panel of judges, is based in Mumbai. There are branches of that court at Nagpur and at Aurangabad.

Maharashtra comprises three conventional regions: western Maharashtra, Vidarbha, and Marathwada. Each is divided administratively into districts, which are further divided into talukas (townships). Local administrations consist of zilla parishads (district councils), panchayat samiti (township councils), and gram panchayats (village councils). Cities and towns have corporations and municipal councils as elected bodies.

The Public Service Commission and a State Selection Board select candidates for appointment to all state services. That process is carried out largely by means of competitive examinations.

Health and welfare

Scores of hospitals and clinics, including general hospitals, women’s hospitals, and mental health institutes, are in Maharashtra. Medical personnel mainly consist of allopathic (traditional Western) and Ayurvedic (ancient Indian) practitioners. Unanī (traditional Muslim) and homeopathic systems of medicine are also popular. The state is a leader in the prevention and control of malaria and parasites such as guinea worms and the nematodes that cause filariasis, in the immunization of children and expectant mothers, and in the treatment of tuberculosis, goitre, leprosy, cancer, and HIV/AIDS. Regional blood banks are in Mumbai, Pune, Aurangabad, and Nagpur, and emergency centres are found in all districts. The state has repeatedly received national recognition for its family-planning program. In Mumbai the Haffkine Institute, a leading bacteriologic research centre specializing in tropical diseases, and the Cancer Research Institute (affiliated with the Tata Memorial Hospital) are well known.

Education

Maharashtra’s literacy rate is one of the highest of all the Indian states, with more than four-fifths of the population able to read and write. The discrepancy between male and female literacy has been reduced since the beginning of the 21st century. The state provides free compulsory education for children between ages 6 and 14. Vocational and multipurpose high schools also have grown in importance.

Larger institutions for higher education include the University of Mumbai (founded 1857) and Shreemati Nathibai Damodar Thackersey Women’s University (1916) in Mumbai, Rashtrasant Tukadoji Maharaj Nagpur University (1923) in Nagpur, the University of Pune (1949) in Pune, Shivaji University (1962) in Kolhapur, and Yashwantrao Chavan Maharashtra Open University (1989) in Nashik. There are other universities in Aurangabad, Ahmadnagar, Akola, Amravati, Jalgaon, and Kolhapur. Some prominent institutions in the state include the Central Institute of Fisheries Education, the Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, the International Institute for Population Sciences, and the Tata Institute of Social Sciences—all in Mumbai—and the Deccan College Postgraduate and Research Institute and the Gokhale Institute of Politics and Economics in Pune.

Several medical, dental, and Ayurvedic colleges are in Mumbai, Nagpur, and Pune. Most district hospitals maintain nursing schools. Technical education is provided by engineering colleges and polytechnic and industrial institutes. Almost every taluka (township) has a technical school.

An important adjunct to education in the state is training courses run by the country’s security establishment. The National Defence Academy near Pune is a premier institution that provides cadet training for India’s defense forces. The College of Military Engineering at Pune is run by the Indian Army Corps of Engineers. Sainik schools (competitive secondary schools that prepare students to serve in the National Defence Academy) and the voluntary National Cadet Corps provide military training. There are also institutes in Maharashtra for research and development in explosives, armament technology, vehicle research, and naval, chemical, and metallurgical laboratories.

Cultural life

Maharashtra is a distinct cultural region. Its long artistic tradition is manifested in the ancient cave paintings found at Ajanta and Ellora just north of Aurangabad, both of which were designated UNESCO World Heritage sites in 1983, in a number of medieval architectural masterpieces, in its classical and devotional music, and in its theatre. Pune, where numerous organizations sustain those great traditions, is the state’s undisputed cultural capital.

The arts

Music in Maharashtra, like Marathi literature, has an ancient tradition. It became allied with Hindustani music about the 14th century. In more recent times Vishnu Digambar Paluskar and Vishnu Narayana Bhatkhande greatly influenced Indian classical music. Contemporary vocalists include Bhimsen Joshi and Lata Mangeshkar.

In rural Maharashtra the foremost diversion is tamasha, a performance form that combined music, drama, and dance. The typical tamasha troupe comprises seven artists, including a female dancer for featured roles and a bawdy clown.

The theatre and the cinema are popular in urban areas of Maharashtra. Leading playwrights V. Khadilkar and Vijay Tendulkar and actor Bal Gandharva raised the status of the Marathi drama as an art form. The Indian movie industry, known as Bollywood, began in Mumbai in the 1930s, and by the early 21st century its films had gained popularity among international audiences. Prabhat Film Company in Pune is one of the country’s leaders in cinema; some of its best-known productions are Sant Tukaram (1936) and Sant Dnyaneshwar (1940). Maharashtrian film pioneers are Dadasaheb Phalke and Baburao Painter, and artists of Hindi cinema include Nana Patekar and Madhuri Dixit.

Recreation

Many festivals are held throughout the year in Maharashtra. Holi and Ranga Panchami are spring festivals. Dussehra (also spelled Dashahara) is an autumn event celebrating the triumph of good over evil. During Pola in August, farmers bathe, decorate, and parade their bulls through the streets, signifying the start of the sowing season. The Ganesha festival, celebrating the birth of Hindu deity Ganesha, is held during the rainy season and is by far the most popular in Maharashtra. Its public celebration was first sponsored by the nationalist political leader Bal Gangadhar Tilak in 1893. Clay idols of Ganesha are sold throughout the state. Unique to Maharashtra is the Hurda party, in which a farmer invites neighbouring villagers to partake of fresh ears of jowar (grain sorghum). ʿĀshūrāʾ, observed on the 10th day of Muḥarram (the first month of the Islamic calendar), honours the martyrs of Islam, although Hindus also participate. Folk songs and traditional dances accompany all those celebrations.

Sitanshu MookerjeeSudhir Vyankatesh WanmaliThe Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica

History

The name Maharashtra, denoting the western upland of the Deccan plateau, first appeared in a 7th-century inscription and in the account of Xuanzang, a Chinese traveler at that time. According to one interpretation, the name derives from the word maharathi (great chariot driver), which refers to a skillful northern fighting force that migrated southward into the area. The group’s language, intermingled with the speech of the earlier Naga settlers, became Maharastri, which by the 8th century had developed into Marathi. There was also a continuous influx of people from remote Greece and Central Asia.

During that early period the territory constituting the present-day state of Maharashtra was divided between several Hindu kingdoms: Satavahana, Vakataka, Kalacuri, Rashtrakuta, Chalukya, and Yadava. A succession of Muslim dynasties ruled after 1307. Persian, the court language of the Muslims, had a far-reaching effect on the Marathi language. By the mid-16th century, Maharashtra was again fragmented between several independent Muslim rulers, who fought each other endlessly. It was in the midst of that chaos that a great leader, Shivaji, was born in 1627. Shivaji showed astonishing prowess by founding a large Maratha empire that shook Delhi-based Mughal rule to its foundations.

During the 18th century almost all of western and central India, as well as large segments of the north and east, was brought under the suzerainty of the Maratha confederacy, an alliance formed after Shivaji’s kingdom had collapsed. Europeans, however, had been present along the coast since the early 16th century. Britain gained control of Bombay Island in 1661, and from the early 19th century onward the Marathas gradually succumbed to British expansion on the mainland. The British proceeded to establish an administrative province known as the Bombay Presidency. After India gained its independence in 1947, the province became Bombay state (1950). A number of former princely states (notably Baroda [now Vadodara]) subsequently were merged into the new state.

On November 1, 1956, in a major linguistic and political reorganization of the states of peninsular India, Bombay state received large parts of Madhya Pradesh, as well as the northwestern portion of the dismembered Hyderabad state (which had been formed after Indian independence from the former Hyderabad princely state). The outcome of that reorganization, however, was still a linguistically divided state, in which most of the Gujarati-speaking peoples lived in the north and most of the Marathi-speaking peoples lived in the south. Demands by the two language groups that the state be divided into two parts resulted, on May 1, 1960, in the creation of Gujarat in the north and the newly renamed Maharashtra in the south. Bombay, remaining part of Maharashtra, became the new state’s capital. The city’s name was changed to Mumbai in the mid-1990s.

Sitanshu MookerjeeSudhir Vyankatesh WanmaliThe Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica

Since independence the state’s politics have been largely controlled by the Indian National Congress (Congress Party). Early chief ministers (heads of government) included Morarji Desai (served 1952–56), who later was India’s prime minister (1977–79), and Yashwantrao Balwantrao Chavan (1956–62), who was widely heralded for his efforts to modernize the state’s economic and social policies. Interruptions in the Congress Party’s rule included two years (1978–80) when Sharad Pawar put together an anti-Congress coalition (although Pawar subsequently headed Congress governments in 1988–91 and 1993–95), and four years (1995–99) when the pro-Hindu Shiv Sena (“Army of Shiva”) party (founded and long dominated by journalist Bal Thackeray) controlled the government. In addition, another pro-Hindu party, the Bharatiya Janata Party, won a plurality of seats in the 2014 state legislative elections and was able to form a ruling coalition.

The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica

This article is about the city. For Nagpur, see Nagpur (disambiguation).

Nagpur
Metropolis
Nickname(s): The Orange city,[1] Tiger Capital Of India

Nagpur

Location of Nagpur in Maharashtra, India

Coordinates: 21°09′N79°05′E / 21.15°N 79.09°E / 21.15; 79.09Coordinates: 21°09′N79°05′E / 21.15°N 79.09°E / 21.15; 79.09
Country India
StateMaharashtra
RegionVidarbha
DistrictNagpur
Founded1702[2]
Founded byGond King Bakht Buland Shah
Government
 • TypeMayor–Council
 • BodyNagpur Municipal Corporation
Nagpur Improvement Trust
 • MPNitin Gadkari[3] (BJP)
 • MayorNanda Jichkar[4] (BJP)
 • CollectorSachin Kurve[5] (IAS)
 • Municipal CommissionerAshwin Mudgal[6] (IAS)
 • Police CommissionerDr. K. Venkatesham[7] (IPS)
Area[8]
 • Metropolis227.36 sq.km km2 (Formatting error: invalid input when rounding sq mi)
 • Metro3,780 km2 (1,460 sq mi)
Elevation310 m (1,020 ft)
Population (2011)[8]
 • Metropolis2,497,870
 • RankIndia: 13th
Maharashtra : 3rd
 • Metro3,602,341 (approx)
 • Metro rank13th
Demonym(s)Nagpurkar, Nagpurian, Nagpurite
Time zoneIST (UTC+5:30)
Pin code(s)440 001 – 440 037[9]
Telephone code+91-712
Vehicle registrationMH31 (Nagpur West)
MH49 (Nagpur East)
MH40 (Nagpur Rural)
Official languageMarathi
UN/LOCODEIN NAG
HDIVery High[10]
Websitewww.nmcnagpur.gov.in

Nagpur is the winter capital, a sprawling metropolis, and the third-largest city of the Indian state of Maharashtra[11] after Mumbai and Pune. Nagpur is the 13th largest Indian city in terms of population.[12] It has been proposed as one of the Smart Cities in Maharashtra.[13]

Nagpur is the seat of the annual winter session of the Maharashtra state assembly. It is a major commercial and political centre of the Vidarbharegion of Maharashtra. In addition, the city derives political importance from being the headquarters for the Hindu nationalist organisation RSS and an important location for the Dalit Buddhist movement. Nagpur is also known for Deekshabhoomi, the largest hollow stupa among all the Buddhist stupas in the world.

According to a survey by ABP News-Ipsos, Nagpur has been identified as the best city in India topping in livability, greenery, public transport, and health care indices.[14][15][16] The city has been adjudged the 20th cleanest city in India and the top mover in the western zone as per Swachh Sarvekshan 2016.[17]

It is famous for Nagpur oranges and is sometimes known as the Orange City for being a major trade center of oranges cultivated in the region.[18] The city was founded in 1703 by the Gonds King Bakht Buland Shah of Deogarh[19] and later became a part of the Maratha Empire under the royal Bhonsale dynasty. The British East India Company took over Nagpur in the 19th century and made it the capital of the Central Provinces and Berar. After the first reorganisation of states, the city lost its status as the capital. Following the informal Nagpur Pact between political leaders, it was made the second capital of Maharashtra.

History[edit]

Main article: History of Nagpur

Also see: Nagpur state

Etymology[edit]

One of the earlier names of Nagpur was "Fanindrapura". It derives its origin from the 'Fana' or hood of a cobra. In fact, Nagpur's first newspaper was named 'Fanindramani', which means a jewel that is believed to be suspended over a cobra's hood. It is this jewel that lights up the darkness, hence the name of the newspaper.[20] The river Nag flows through the city. B. R. Ambedkar claimed that both the city and the river are named after "Nag people".[21] The word "pur" means "city" in many Indian languages.[22] During British rule, the name of the city was spelt and pronounced as "Nagpore".[23]

Early and medieval history[edit]

In the 18th century, this city was created by leader of Gond Dynasty named Bakht Buland Shah in the first half of the century. Human existence around present-day Nagpur can be traced back 3000 years to the 8th century BCE. Mehir burial sites at the Drugdhamna (near the Mhada colony) indicate that the megalithic culture existed around Nagpur and is still followed.[24] The first reference to the name "Nagpur" is found in a 10th-century copper-plate inscription discovered at Devali in the neighbouring Wardha district. The inscription is a record of grant of a village situated in the visaya (district) of Nagpura-Nandivardhana during the time of the Rastrakuta king Krsna III in the Saka year 862 (940 CE).[25] Towards the end of the 3rd century, King Vindhyasakti is known to have ruled the Nagpur region. In the 4th century, the Vakataka Dynasty ruled over the Nagpur region and surrounding areas and had good relations with the Gupta Empire. The Vakataka king Prithvisena I moved his capital to Nagardhan (ancient name Nandivardhana), 28 kilometres (17 mi) from Nagpur.[26] After the Vakatakas, the region came under the rule of the Hindu kingdoms of the Badami Chalukyas, the Rashtrakutas, and finally the Yadavas. In 1296, Allauddin Khilji invaded the Yadava Kingdom after capturing Deogiri, after which the Tughlaq Dynasty came to power in 1317. In the 17th century, the Mughal Empire conquered the region, however during Mughal era, regional administration was carried out by the Gond kingdom of Deogarh-Nagpur in the Chhindwara district of the modern-day state of Madhya Pradesh.[27] In the 18th, century Bhonsles of the Maratha Empire established the Nagpur Kingdom based in the city.[28]

Modern history[edit]

The next Raja (king) of Deogarh[ambiguous] was Chand Sultan, who resided principally in the country below the hills, fixing his capital at Nagpur, which he turned into a walled town. On Chand Sultan's death in 1739, Wali Shah, an illegitimate son of Bakht Buland, usurped the throne and Chand Sultan's widow invoked the aid of the Maratha leader Raghoji Bhosale of Berar in the interest of her sons Akbar Shah and Burhan Shah. The usurper was put to death and the rightful heirs placed on the throne. After 1743, a series of Maratha rulers came to power, starting with Raghoji Bhosale, who conquered the territories of Deogarh, Chanda and Chhattisgarh by 1751.[29]

Nagpur was burnt substantially in 1765 and again partially in 1811 by marauding Pindaris. However, the development of city of Nagpur continued.[30] In 1803 Raghoji II Bhosale joined the Peshwa against the British in the Second Anglo-Maratha War, but the British prevailed. After Raghoji II's death in 1816, his son Parsaji was deposed and murdered by Mudhoji II Bhosale. Despite the fact that he had entered into a treaty with the British in the same year, Mudhoji joined the Peshwa in the Third Anglo-Maratha War in 1817 against the British but suffered a defeat at Sitabuldi in present-day Nagpur city. The fierce battle was a turning point as it laid the foundations of the downfall of the Bhosales and paved the way for the British acquisition of Nagpur city.[31] Mudhoji was deposed after a temporary restoration to the throne, after which the British placed Raghoji III Bhosale, the grandchild of Raghoji II, on the throne. During the rule of Raghoji III(which lasted till 1840), the region was administered by a British resident. In 1853, the British took control of Nagpur after Raghoji III died without leaving an heir.[32]

From 1853 to 1861, the Nagpur Province (which consisted of the present Nagpur region, Chhindwara, and Chhattisgarh) became part of the Central Provinces and Berar and came under the administration of a commissioner under the British central government, with Nagpur as its capital. Berar was added in 1903.[33] The advent of the Great Indian Peninsula Railway (GIP) in 1867 spurred its development as a trade centre.[34]Tata group started the country's first textile mill at Nagpur, formally known as Central India Spinning and Weaving Company Ltd. The company was popularly known as "Empress Mills" as it was inaugurated on 1 January 1877, the day queen Victoria was proclaimed Empress of India.[35]

The non-co-operation movement was launched in the Nagpur session of 1920.[36] The city witnessed a Hindu–Muslim riot in 1923 which had profound impact on K. B. Hedgewar,[37] who in 1925 founded the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS), a Hindu nationalist organisation in Mohitewada Mahal, Nagpur with an idea of creating a Hindu nation. After the 1927 Nagpur riots RSS gained further popularity in Nagpur and the organisation grew nationwide.[38]

After Indian independence[edit]

After India gained independence in 1947, Central Provinces and Berar became a province of India. In 1950, the Central Provinces and Berar was reorganised as the Indian state of Madhya Pradesh with Nagpur as its capital.[39] When the Indian states were reorganised along the linguistic lines in 1956, Nagpur and Berar regions were transferred to the state of Bombay, which was split into the states of Maharashtra and Gujarat in 1960.[40] At a formal public ceremony held on 14 October 1956 in Nagpur, B. R. Ambedkar and his supporters converted to Buddhism, which started the Dalit Buddhist movement that is still active.[41] In 1994, the city of Nagpur witnessed its most violent day in modern times in the form of Gowari stampede.[42]

Nagpur completed 300 years of establishment in the year 2002. A big celebration was organised to mark the event.[43]

Geography[edit]

Nagpur
Climate chart (explanation)
JFMAMJJASOND

 

 

10

 

 

31

10

 

 

12

 

 

34

13

 

 

18

 

 

38

17

 

 

13

 

 

42

22

 

 

16

 

 

45

26

 

 

172

 

 

40

24

 

 

304

 

 

34

22

 

 

292

 

 

32

22

 

 

194

 

 

34

21

 

 

51

 

 

35

18

 

 

12

 

 

32

13

 

 

17

 

 

30

10

Average max. and min. temperatures in °C
Precipitation totals in mm
Source: World Weather Information Service
Imperial conversion
JFMAMJJASOND

 

 

0.4

 

 

87

51

 

 

0.5

 

 

93

55

 

 

0.7

 

 

101

63

 

 

0.5

 

 

108

71

 

 

0.6

 

 

112

79

 

 

6.8

 

 

104

76

 

 

12

 

 

92

72

 

 

11

 

 

90

71

 

 

7.6

 

 

93

70

 

 

2

 

 

94

64

 

 

0.5

 

 

90

55

 

 

0.7

 

 

86

50

Average max. and min. temperatures in °F
Precipitation totals in inches

Topography[edit]

Nagpur is located at the exact centre of the Indian peninsula. The city has the Zero Mile Stone locating the geographical centre of India, which was used by the British to measure all distances within the Indian subcontinent.

The city lies on the Deccan plateau of the Indian Peninsula and has a mean altitude of 310.5 meters above sea level.[44] The underlying rock strata are covered with alluvial deposits resulting from the flood plain of the Kanhan River. In some places these give rise to granular sandy soil. In low-lying areas, which are poorly drained, the soil is alluvial clay with poor permeability characteristics. In the eastern part of the city, crystalline metamorphic rocks such as gneiss, schist and granites are found, while in the northern part yellowish sand stones and clays of the lower Gondwana formations are found.[45] Nagpur city is dotted with natural and artificial lakes. The largest lake is Ambazari Lake. Other natural lakes include Gorewada Lake and Telangkhedi lake. Sonegaon and Gandhisagar Lakes are artificial, created by the city's historical rulers.[46] Nag river, Pilli Nadi, and nallas form the natural drainage pattern for the city.[47] Nagpur is known for its greenery and was adjudged the cleanest and second greenest in India after Chandigarh in 2010.[48]

Climate[edit]

Nagpur has tropical savannah climate (Köppen climate classification) with dry conditions prevailing for most of the year. It receives about 163 mm of rainfall in June. The amount of rainfall is increased in July to 294 mm. Gradual decrease of rainfall has been observed from July to August (278 mm) and September (160 mm).[44] The highest recorded daily rainfall was 304 mm on 14 July 1994.[49] Summers are extremely hot, lasting from March to June, with May being the hottest month. Winter lasts from November to January, during which temperatures drop below 10 °C (50 °F).[44] The highest recorded temperature in the city was 48 °C on 19 May 2015, while the lowest was 3.9 °C on 16 January 2016. [50]

Climate data for Nagpur Airport (1971–1990)
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high °C (°F)36.6
(97.9)
39.2
(102.6)
45.0
(113)
46.1
(115)
47.8
(118)
47.7
(117.9)
40.6
(105.1)
37.8
(100)
38.9
(102)
39.5
(103.1)
35.6
(96.1)
39.7
(103.5)
47.8
(118)
Average high °C (°F)28.7
(83.7)
31.2
(88.2)
36.2
(97.2)
40.7
(105.3)
42.4
(108.3)
37.5
(99.5)
31.6
(88.9)
30.5
(86.9)
32.3
(90.1)
32.7
(90.9)
30.4
(86.7)
28.1
(82.6)
33.5
(92.3)
Daily mean °C (°F)20.8
(69.4)
23.2
(73.8)
27.7
(81.9)
32.5
(90.5)
35.1
(95.2)
31.9
(89.4)
27.9
(82.2)
27.1
(80.8)
27.7
(81.9)
26.4
(79.5)
23.0
(73.4)
20.4
(68.7)
27.0
(80.6)
Average low °C (°F)12.9
(55.2)
15.1
(59.2)
19.2
(66.6)
24.3
(75.7)
27.8
(82)
26.3
(79.3)
24.1
(75.4)
23.6
(74.5)
23.1
(73.6)
20.0
(68)
15.5
(59.9)
12.6
(54.7)
20.4
(68.7)
Record low °C (°F)3.9
(39)
5.0
(41)
8.3
(46.9)
13.9
(57)
19.4
(66.9)
20.0
(68)
19.4
(66.9)
18.3
(64.9)
16.6
(61.9)
11.6
(52.9)
6.7
(44.1)
5.5
(41.9)
3.9
(39)
Average precipitation mm (inches)12.5
(0.492)
20.7
(0.815)
17.6
(0.693)
14.3
(0.563)
19.2
(0.756)
190.1
(7.484)
341.7
(13.453)
280.5
(11.043)
183.1
(7.209)
56.8
(2.236)
16.6
(0.654)
13.2
(0.52)
1,166.3
(45.917)
Average rainy days (≥ 1.0 mm)1.82.21.91.22.911.417.516.510.44.01.31.172.2
Average relative humidity (%)54433024275577807461555653
Mean monthly sunshine hours272.0268.3287.6290.8293.8186.6115.4116.7182.5260.4264.1268.82,807
Source #1: NOAA[51]

[52]

Source #2: India Meteorological Department (record high and low up to 2010)[53]

Extreme weather

The average number of heat wave days occurring in Nagpur in the Summer months of March, April & May is 0.5, 2.4 and 7.2 days respectively. May is the most uncomfortable and hottest month with, for example, 18 days of heat waves being experienced in 1973, 1988 and 2010. The summer season is characterised by other severe weather activity like thunderstorms, dust storms, hailstorms and squalls. Generally, hailstorms occur during March and dust storms during March and April. These occur infrequently (0.1 per day). Squalls occur more frequently with 0.3 per day in March and April rising to 0.8 per day in May.[44] Due to the heat waves in the city the Indian Government with the help of New York-based National Resources Defense Council has launched a heat wave program from March 2016.[54]

Administration[edit]

Second capital of Maharashtra[edit]

Nagpur was the capital of Central Provinces and Berar for 100 years. After the State Reorganisation in 1956, Nagpur and Vidarbha region become part of the new Maharashtra State. With this Nagpur lost the capital status and hence a pact was signed between leaders, the Nagpur Pact. According to the pact, Nagpur is the second capital of Maharashtra and the winter session of state legislature and the state legislative council takes place in Vidhan Bhavan, Nagpur.[55]:671 Nagpur has a District court and its own bench of the Bombay High Court. The city consists of six Vidhan Sabha constituencies namely Nagpur West, Nagpur South, Nagpur South West, Nagpur East, Nagpur North and Nagpur Central. These constituencies are part of the Nagpur Lok Sabha constituency.[56]

Local government[edit]

The Municipal Council for Nagpur was established in 1864. At that time, the area under the jurisdiction of the Nagpur Municipal Council was 15.5 km2 and the population was 82,000. The duties entrusted to the Nagpur Municipal Council were to maintain cleanliness and arrange for street lights and water supply with government assistance. The Municipal Corporation came into existence in March 1951. Nagpur is administered by the Nagpur Municipal Corporation (NMC), which is a democratically elected civic governing body. The Corporation elects a Mayor who along with a Deputy Mayor heads the organisation. The Mayor carries out the activities through various committees such as the Standing Committee, health and sanitation committee, education committee, water works, public works, public health and market committee. The administrative head of the Corporation is the Municipal Commissioner, an Indian Administrative Service (IAS) officer appointed by the state government. The Municipal Commissioner along with the Deputy Municipal Commissioners, carry out various activities related to engineering, health and sanitation, taxation and its recovery. Various departments such as public relations, library, health, finance, buildings, slums, roads, street lighting, traffic, establishment, gardens, public works, local audit, legal services, water works, education, octroi and fire services manage their specific activities. The activities of NMC are administered by its zonal offices. There are 10 zonal offices in Nagpur – Laxmi Nagar, Dharampeth, Hanuman Nagar, Dhantoli, Nehru Nagar, Gandhi Baugh, Sataranjipura, Lakkadganj, Ashi Nagar and Mangalwari. These zones are divided into 145 wards. Each ward is represented by a corporator, a majority of whom are elected in local elections.[57] NMC has various departments including healthcare, education, fire brigade etc. dedicated for each service and project of the city.[58]Nagpur Improvement Trust (NIT) is a local planning authority which works with NMC and carries out the development of the civic infrastructure and new urban areas on its behalf. NIT is headed by a Chairman, an Indian Administrative Service Officer appointed by the state government.[59]

Nagpur Police is headed by a Police Commissioner who is of the rank of Additional Director General of Police of Maharashtra Police. Nagpur Police is Divided into 4 Zones, each headed by a Deputy Commissioner of Police.[60] The State C.I.D Regional Headquarter[61] and State Reserve Police Force Campus[62] are situated in Nagpur.

Utility services[edit]

Originally, all the utility services of the city were carried out by NMC departments, but from 2008 onwards privatisation had started for major utility services.[63] The Orange City Water Private Limited (OCW), a joint venture of Veolia Water India Pvt. Ltd and Vishwaraj Infrastructure Ltd., manages the water supply for the city as well as Nagpur Municipal Corporation’s Water Treatment Plants at Gorewada, all the elevated service reservoirs, ground service reservoirs, master balancing reservoirs commonly known as Water Tanks.[64] This joint venture was established in November 2011 and was awarded the contract to execute 24x7 water supply project and operational and maintenance of water works for 25 years.[65] Kanak Resources Management Ltd. has been awarded the contract for garbage collection in the city as per Nagpur Bin Free Project in 2009 by NMC.[66][67] It collects garbage from all the residents in the city and then delivers it to the Bhandewadi dumpyard in Nagpur's eastern part.[68] Similarly, in electricity supply, which was first managed by MSEB was then replaced by MSEDCL. After some years the distribution franchisee system was introduced to reduce the losses in the divisions and so Spanco was awarded the distribution franchisee for 15 years to manage three of the four divisions from Nagpur Urban circle namely, Civil Lines, Mahal and Gandhibagh on 23 February 2011 by MSEDCL.[69][70] To facilitate this system, Spanco Nagpur Discom Limited or SNDL Nagpur company was formed for the sole purpose of electricity distribution and maintenance in three divisions of the city.[71] The power distribution and maintenance for the fourth division i.e. Congress Nagar division is still being managed by MSEDCL.[72]India Post which is a governmental postal department has two head post offices and many post offices and sub-post offices at various locations in the city and are part of the logistics services in the city along with various other private operators.[73]

Health care[edit]

See also: List of hospitals in Nagpur

NMC in collaboration with Central Government, State Government, UNICEF, World Health Organization and Non-governmental organisation conducts and maintains various health schemes in the city. City health line is an initiative started by NMC dedicated to the health of citizens of Nagpur. This includes providing computerised comparative information and action in the field to Local citizens.[74] NMC runs three indoor patient hospitals including Indira Gandhi Rugnalaya at LAD square, Panchpaoli Maternity Hospital in Panchpaoli and Isolation Hospital in Immamwada. Besides, the civic body runs three big diagnostic centres at Mahal, Sadar and also at Indira Gandhi Rugnalaya. Apart from these, NMC has 57 out patient dispensaries (OPDs), including 23 health posts sanctioned under Union Government's schemes, 15 allopathy hospitals, 12 ayurvedic hospitals, three homoeopathy hospitals, three naturopathy hospitals and one unani hospital.[75] In 2013, ABP News-Ipsos declared Nagpur the country's best city for health care services.[76] The city is home to numerous hospitals, some run by the government and some private. Nagpur is a health hub for Central India & caters to a large geographical area arbitrarily bounded by Delhi in the North, Calcutta in the East, Mumbai-Pune in the West and Hyderabad in the South. People from Madhya Pradesh, Chhattisgarh, Uttar Pradesh, Orissa, Andhra Pradesh and Telangana regularly come to Nagpur for their health needs.[77] Nagpur boasts of super-specialty physicians & surgeons[78] serving its population in both public sector government run hospitals and well equipped private hospitals catering to all strata of society.[79] AIIMS Nagpur is the latest feather in the cap of Nagpur health care services.[80]

According to 2005 National Family Health Survey, Nagpur has a fertility rate of 1.9 which is below the replacement level.[81]:46,47 The infant mortality rate was 43 per 1,000 live births, and the mortality rate for children under five was 50 per 1,000 live births.[81]:47,48 About 57% slum and 72% non-slum children have received all the mandatory vaccines which include BCG, measles and full courses of polio and DPT.[81]:48,49 In Nagpur, 78 percent of poor children are anaemic, including 49 percent who have moderate to severe anaemia.[81]:55 About 45% of children under 5 years of age and 31% of women are underweight.[81]:54,55 The poor people from the city mostly cite the reason of lack of a nearby facility, poor quality of care and excessive waiting time for not visiting any government hospitals for treatment.[81]:61

Greater Nagpur Metropolitan Area[edit]

Main articles: Greater Nagpur Metropolitan Area and List of localities in Nagpur

Nagpur is the third largest in Maharashtra in terms of population as per the 2011 census.[82]

Since the 1990s the urban agglomeration has rapidly expanded beyond the City’s municipal boundaries. This growth has presented challenges for the future growth of the city and its fringes in an organised manner. With a view to achieve balanced development within the region, the Nagpur Improvement Trust

Map of Nagpur district with major towns and rivers
Central Provinces and Berar, 1903. Princely states are shown in yellow.

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